Tracker Pixel for Entry

​Subject matter that matters

by Ben Haugmo | .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) | Arts | March 29th, 2017

Art courtesy of Barbara Nagle

Next week marks the beginning of the 50th annual Hawley Art Show. Featuring food, music, people’s choice judging events, and more. This year’s show will really demonstrate the sense of community that has been fostered for fifty years.

The exhibit is free of charge and open to the public, and submissions from artists only require a small fee. Any artist can enter their work in the show, regardless of skill level, and children’s submissions are also accepted.

For many, the Hawley Art Show is an opportunity to pass a passion for art to others. Barbara Nagle taught art for 15 years before becoming a full-time artist, and will be offering a watercolor demonstration during the show.

Nagle has created art since she was very young, using the pencil and paper her mother provided. One of her favorite aspects of the Hawley Art Show is the children’s art component.

“The whole back section of the Community Center is youth art. It’s kindergarten and on up through high school, and it really gives young people an opportunity to show their work in an official art show, which is great. To me, a sense of community means involving people of all ages.”

M. Koskela has been involved with the Hawley Art Show for as long as she can remember and appreciates the fact that it accepts artists of all ages and skill levels.

“I’ve gone to the Hawley Art Show my entire life. I don’t remember a year not going to it, really. You can be a student, you can be an amateur, you can be a professional, and you can be in grade school, and you can still enter the art show.”

Koskela’s art has evolved since she first submitted pictures of kitty cats when she was younger, featuring environmentally conscious pieces that reflect her attentive recycling practices.

“I really enjoy post-apocalyptic kind of things. A lot of my art is kind of environmentally aware, things like that. I like to recycle my canvases if I can. I make my own canvases out of window screens, and I like reusing paint whenever I can.”

Some of the participants in the Hawley Art Show became involved only recently. M. Koskela introduced her spouse, Sophia, to the Hawley Art Show after they met in 2010. Sophia Koskela focuses on portraiture, especially of famous people that she admires.

“I’ve done Vincent Price, Johnny Depp, Jimi Hendrix, and David Bowie. I also did Prince when he passed away, and David Bowie. I’ve been doing a lot of tributes to people that have been passing away, so I kind of like to do portraits that are more realistic looking.”

Judi Koehmstedt has been painting for around 50 years, and enjoys painting down-to-earth scenes inspired by her life in North Dakota.

“I really like to paint figures and people, everyday life type of things. Farm-y things, old cars, barns, stuff like that. The subject matter matters to me.”

One piece of advice Koemstedt offers--in line with many of the lessons given by the other artists entering the show--is to work on one’s skills of observation.

“I don’t think people look at things like they should, just see the shapes and the shadows. Those of us that do that are very lucky.”

Some of the artists involved in the show didn’t at first expect to become artists.

Karen Bakke began taking art in seventh grade, not thinking it would lead her anywhere, but her teacher had different plans for her.

“I had an old German nun that demanded that I come back the next year, so I did, and there began my artistic journey. She saw something that I didn’t even think about or know about that no one else saw.”

Bakke eventually got her degree in graphic design before switching to fine art. Her inspiration leads her to create based on a variety of different subjects. “I love doing animals and portraits, but if I see a flower or landscape--I’m easily inspired, and I like to paint everything.”

Bakke appreciates the Hawley Art Show for the ease of entry that it affords artists. “One thing I like is that you can decide last minute what paintings you want to put in, and you don’t have to reserve them months in advance. You just walk in and give them your paintings. It’s so uncomplicated compared to a lot of shows. They’re so hospitable.”

IF YOU GO

The 50th Annual Hawley Art Show

Thursday, April 6, 6:30pm to Sunday, April 9, at 4pm

Hawley Community Center, 137 Main St, Hawley, Minn.

Free admission, $5 fee for art submissions

Recently in:

FARGO – Police are looking for young man in connection to a homicide in South Fargo. On Friday, September 21, 2018 at 11:23 a.m., Fargo Police and Fire personnel responded to an apartment located within 2302 17 St. S. for medical…

by Ryan Jankeryanjanke@hpr1.comPhoto by Anne BradleyValkyries of the Valley will invade the North Dakota Apartment Wrestling Federation (NDAWF) for Brawl-esque, a variety show that will be held at Prairie Brothers Brewing Company…

Best Bets

Spirit Talk

by HPR Staff

Thursday, September 27, 7-9 p.m.Homewood Suites by Hilton Fargo, 2021 16th St N., FargoGet in touch with the other side! Sunny Dawn Johnston will help you reach the spirit world in this two-hour, eye-opening event. This is a group…

It’s bad enough when his word versus her word regarding sexual assault gets out in a high school hallway, but can you imagine it spreading throughout the national news media? Imagine reliving those events every time you turn on…

We failed to educate the players of “flag” footballI passed all of the American history courses in Morrison County District 54, Little Falls High School, and Moorhead State Teachers College, but I’m often appalled about what…

FARGO - A collection of memories from High Plains Reader's annual Cocktail Showdown. Participants were judged on creativity, flavor, and presentation; and this year we added a new category. Like years before, each establishment was…

by Ryan Jankeryanjanke@hpr1.comAs I sat across from my wife at Himalayan Yak Tuesday evening, it dawned on me that time had slowed down. So often when we go out to eat, we are in a hurry. We get anxious when we aren’t greeted…

Music

Back in the saddle

by Sabrina Hornung

After a long hiatus members of Teenage Lobotomy reunited for the first time in 22 years at Center Fest in Robinson North Dakota this summer. With influences such as Husker Du and the Circle Jerks their high energy immediately had…

Director Craig William Macneill speculates on the infamous legend surrounding Massachusetts murder suspect Lizzie Borden in “Lizzie,” a long-germinating labor of love for star Chloe Sevigny. Working from a screenplay by Bryce…

It may be cliche to say the apple doesn’t fall too far from the tree, but when wet plate artist Shane Balkowitsch found out that his 15-year-old daughter Abby Balkowitsch was following in his photography footsteps, he was…

by Stella Mehlhoffstellamehlhoff@gmail.com“Our mission is to invigorate civic conversation through intimate and transformative storytelling.” This statement posted on Theatre B’s website and tacked to their studio wall in…

In the approximately three years I’ve been writing for the High Plains Reader it seems I’ve always circled back to comedian Adam Quesnell. First, I wrote about his farewell show before he set out from Fargo and the comedy…

When walking into the new space on 1st Ave N that now houses Drekker brewing, one can only say, “Wow.” The majesty of the interior is unprecedented for a brewery in the region and provides a feeling of awe and astonishment.…

I’m a big man, I’m tall and powerful, but this also causes some issues in the body department. I suffer from acute scoliosis in my lower back, and pain radiates from this area on a daily basis. I have only ever had one massage…

By Melissa Martinmelissamartincounselor@live.comThink back to one of your worst small decisions. Then answer the following questions:How did you make the decision?What happened after the decision?When did you know it was the worst…

by Andrew Alexis Varvelmr.a.alexis.varvel@gmail.com“If a piece of equipment purchased in the 1920s is kept up and can guarantee, at present, an operable rate close to 100 percent and if it can bear the production burden placed on…