Tracker Pixel for Entry

​‘Entrapped’ during Nobel panel

by C.S. Hagen | .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) | News | December 24th, 2017

Law enforcement marching on activists - photo by C.S. HagenOSLO, NORWAY – American Indigenous leaders took insult this week during a Nobel Peace Prize forum, after a Morton County leader addressed issues pertaining to the Dakota Access Pipeline controversy.

Morton County Commissioner Cody Schultz, an outspoken proponent of the Dakota Access Pipeline, was one of 500 “ticketed guests,” and was invited by event contractor Stephanie Hope Smith of the Nobel Institute to speak during the “Across Dividing Lines: Indigenous People’s Rights Within the Context of Social Justice and Environmental Protection” forum, according to an “Oceti Sakowin Nobel Peace Prize Forum Attendees Speak Out” press release. The discussion followed this year’s Nobel Peace Prize to ICAN, the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

HolyElk Lafferty, MniCoujou, Oglala and Sicangu Lakota; Tim Mentz, Pa Baksa Dakota and Hunkpapa Lakota member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of Makoche Wowapi, Mentz-Wilson Consultants, LLC; and Angela Bibens, Esq., Santee Dakota, of Red Owl Law participated in three days of Nobel Institute events.

“The fact that we had not been informed of Mr. Schulz’ invitation prior to this event makes it apparent to me that this was an intentional attempt to entrap us in an uncomfortable space with a high-level representative from the opposing side of the fight for our sacred water in Standing Rock,” Lafferty said.

“What Ms. Smith had hoped for anyone to gain from such a setup is beyond my comprehension. Had I known in advance that her intention was to force such an inappropriate dialogue, I would have declined the invitation, as it puts me in a vulnerable and potentially dangerous position legally and emotionally. I still have pending charges in Morton County after being arrested while in prayer, as well as active daily trauma that is a direct result of the inhumane actions of Morton County.”

“I was led to believe that my role at the forum was to talk about the destruction of sacred sites along the Dakota Access Pipeline corridor,” Mentz said. “That was why I came. I said I would refuse to participate on day two with Mr. Schulz present because I am not in a position to engage in high level dialogue with Morton County.”

“The Morton County government in North Dakota is responsible for committing thousands of human rights violations through their oversight of the Morton County Sheriff’s Office,” a press release from Bibens, an attorney with Red Owl Law stated. With more than 300 criminal cases still pending, these violations are ongoing, Bibens said.

Schultz, who is also the disaster relief chief for the North Dakota Department of Emergency Services, attended the Nobel Peace Prize panel to offer information from the government’s perspective during Norway’s Copper Mine controversy, according to media reports.

Chief Arvol Looking Horse, a spiritual leader for the Sioux, also expressed his disappointment with Schultz’s invitation to speak at the Nobel Peace Prize forum.

“My understanding was that there was going to be dialogue concerning sacred sites and a panel discussion on human rights,” Looking Horse stated. “Upon return of the delegation it was brought to my attention that the Chair of the Morton County Commission, Cody Schultz, had been invited by Stephanie to attend this conference. I feel responsible for putting my friends and relatives in a situation where they were unaware of the commissioner’s attendance because I asked them to attend on my behalf. This uncomfortable situation has jeopardized the reputation and safety of my friends and relatives that attended, as well as myself.

“The media has portrayed the situation to look as if this meeting in Oslo had been planned with all parties in agreement and with prior knowledge, when that was not the case. I have been informed by the delegates that they were taken by surprise at the announcement of his presence. I am very disappointed that the event was not what I had been informed it would be.”

Schultz was present during the first day of panel participation, but was absent on the second day, the press release stated. 

Recently in:

FARGO - Hundreds of thousands of women and men, young and old, took to the streets across America on Saturday, raising awareness for issues from women's rights, Black Lives Matter, missing Indigenous women, DACA, immigration…

When I was a young boy of five I was lucky enough to have a black and white TV in our house. I had a lot of friends in those day because I let the whole neighborhood come over on Saturday morning to watch cartoons. I distinctly…

Wednesday, January 24, 6pmFargo Theatre, 314 Broadway NThe very first showing of “Homegrown: From Farm to Fargo,” a half-hour documentary shot, written, edited and produced by mass communication and journalism students at…

Last week I was asked to appear and speak on behalf of Matt Pausch, owner of the Oasis, before the Public Works and Safety Committee in Wahpeton. The Pausches are great people and I will never forget the time I spent at the Oasis.…

Corky had a knee replaced in late December and she has been diligently doing the physical therapy connected with the rehab. Although the operation was done in Fargo, I imagine the procedure would have cost about the same if it had…

Rhombus GuysWhile they may be known locally and throughout the region for their restaurants, which feature over thirty different pizzas, and their recent addition of a brewery in Grand Forks, Rhombus Guys also proudly pour from a…

Do you eat enough vegetables? Almost no one does. The current USDA nutrition guidelines for adults recommend 2.5 to 3 cups of vegetables to be eaten daily. Other nutrition sources indicate this number can be upwards of 6 cups of…

No one who has lived in Fargo for any length of time has to be told how bitterly cold it can get here during the winter. As much as we might complain about the cold temperatures, the biting winds, or the copious amounts of snow, we…

Now playing on Netflix Instant Watch, Voyeur is the curious story of strange bedfellows Gay Talese -- the once influential and celebrated journalist -- and Gerald Foos, a creepy peeper who spied on the guests at his hotel,…

High Plains Reader: How did the idea for Daily Trump Cartoon come to you -- what was your call to action?Peter Yuenger: It wasn't really a call to action, It was more of a New Year’s resolution to get back in the habit of drawing…

Smoke starts to seep from the sides of the stage and a rocker’s voice echoes over the crowd: “Are you ready to rock?!”You might think that you’re at a rock concert, if you weren’t seated in a black box theatre. For the…

Humor

​Talking to strangers

by Sabrina Hornung

“I don’t have a tour, like, on the back of a sweatshirt,” comedian Paula Poundstone says. “I go out every weekend. This weekend I went out Friday, Saturday and Monday. Mostly it’s Friday/Saturday or Thursday through…

“What are some of your favorite bottles of whiskey?” is a question I get asked quite frequently and is often harder to answer than one might think. One of the great rewards of my profession is getting to sample some of the…

Essential oils. They are all the buzz lately. It seems everyone has heard of them or is purchasing them. Some people know how to use them; others are just interested in the wonder of their complex scents.Essential oils are as…

Live and Learn

​The other shoe

by HPR Contributor

By Elizabeth Nawrotnawrot@mnstate.eduI look up from my hotel lobby breakfast astonished to see a framed print of Wassily Kandinsky's "Mit und Gegen,” a masterpiece of color and composition that just happens to be my favorite…

By Gary Olsonolsong@moravian.edu“Kissing a man without a beard is like eating an egg without salt.”— Dutch proverb, probably written by a man.“Kissing a man with a beard is like going on a picnic. You don’t mind going…