Tracker Pixel for Entry

Should Fargo have another bike co-op?

by A.D. Ness | .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) | Last Word | April 5th, 2017

The answer is yes, of course it should. However, that is the simple answer. There is much more to it than that; and to understand the answer, one must understand why the last one closed.

When the FMCBW -- Fargo Moorhead Community Bicycle Workshop -- first opened it was extraordinarily political -- WAY too political. For a long time it felt like it was a Social Service agency that just happened to also fix bicycles.

Not that there is anything wrong with helping others, but as a bike shop, it seemed like just way too much attention was devoted to others’ causes, at the expense of its core mission, to get people on bikes.

The structure of its leadership presented problems. What started as a horizontal collective, where each member was equal, slowly devolved into a vertical collective with far too many “leaders,” that still tried to pass itself off as a horizontal collective when it obviously wasn’t.

If there is to be another co-op, a decision must be made at the very beginning: what will it be?

In my opinion, the horizontal collective concept just did not work. How can an organization run itself if nobody is actually in charge?

Decisions were being made by a select few members anyway, why pretend otherwise? Stick with the tried and true chain of command structure (the vertical collective) to avoid the myriads of problems the horizontal collective encountered time and time again, and the new co-op would run much, much smoother.

Another thing that was extremely problematic was the presentation of new ideas. It didn’t seem to matter how many times an idea was presented, or how it was presented, or to whom. Written ideas were simply dismissed, verbal ideas didn’t make it to the meetings, or were “shelved” for weeks at a time until they were simply forgotten. New issues would arise, burying the old ideas.

It always felt like the original mission statement (overtly political) would be the main reason for dismissing profit-generating ideas time and again.

Don’t get me wrong, the Community Bicycle Workshop did wonderful things, and helped a great many people to get a bike, but it could have accomplished so much more if it hadn’t written such a limiting set of guidelines at the very beginning. Nothing is set in stone, so why did it feel like it simply MUST be that way?

Also, while the beginning may have been one kind of community bike shop, the last days were something else entirely. It transformed into basically, a back-yard bike shop, with very limited community education, and far too much bike shop.

One of the founding fundamentals was payment for using the Workshop by volunteering one’s time there.

At the end, the work-trade aspect was all but eliminated in an attempt to sell everything simply to keep the doors open, which was so contrary to why it was started in the first place -- to help people who couldn’t afford a bike, get a bike.

So how should it be structured if another bike co-op were to get started? What would need to be different for it to work this time? The answer is a clear chain-of-command, with an actual leader who runs it for a pre-specified amount of time (one year? two years?); and separating the two distinct areas within the co-op (educational vs profit-generating) would ease the headaches all around, as some people like to show others how to fix bikes, some people don’t; some like to sell bikes, while others don’t.

Why all the overstepping of what were obvious divisions within the organization? There was a place for everyone that wanted to help until the iron-clad rule system turned so many people away with its inflexibility.

I am reminded of a quote I long-ago heard, “Sometimes the groups that proclaim themselves to be the most all-inclusive end up as the most elitist.” And yes, some of the FMCBW members fell victim to that very trait, often by employing utterly condescending “tone-policing” tactics to shut people down.

“Community” means just that, the community, not just the few that felt their vision was the purest. They were just bicycles, there was no need to take everything so incredibly “we’re-saving-the-world” seriously.

Recently in:

BISMARCK – When Kyle Thompson decided to speak out against tactics used along the Dakota Access Pipeline, it wasn’t because of a change of heart.“I’ve always tried to look out for the best interests of everyone,” said…

Photos by Raul GomezLast Sunday we had our annual Best of the Best awards ceremony at The Plains Art Museum. we don’t mean to brag but we’re the area’s longest­-running media poll, meaning we’ve been relying on you -- our…

July 24-27, 1pmMake Room, 806½ Main Ave, Fargo4-day arts-intensive camp! Water has qualities of impermanence, imperfection, and fluidity, all fantastic areas of practice for growing artists. Art Camp will include a wide variety of…

"No, not rich. I am a poor man with money, which is not the same thing."-Gabriel Garcia MarquezThis idea is something that has been gnawing at me for awhile, but I don't know where to express these thoughts or how to communicate…

Three “great leaders” who might really screw up the worldIf you have had a chance to watch documentaries based on North Korean culture you had to notice that all citizens referred to 33-year-old Kim Jong Un as their “Great…

The moment of truth has arrived. After seven weeks of sampling and judging some of the finest libations in the area the results for this year’s Cocktail Showdown have arrived. Christopher Larson, Raul Gomez and Sabrina Hornung…

On a sultry Thursday night, I sauntered into Luna. Situated on South University next to Bernie’s Beer and Wine, it isn’t exactly a hole in the wall, but it is certainly off the beaten path, and as described by their motto it is…

The High Plains Reader had the opportunity to chat with Goo Goo Dolls Bassist Robby Takac about their origins, their ever evolving sound, and the impact of “Iris.”High Plains Reader: You grew up in Buffalo New York. What was…

Fourteen years ago this month, entertainment icon Bob Hope died at age 100. Born in 1903, Hope performed in vaudeville and theatre in the 1920s and 30s, moved into radio and films in the 1930s, and by the 1940s was a major movie…

Shane Balkowitsch was nervous. He squatted under an inky shroud, gazing ahead above the rim of his eyeglasses. In front of him, hoisted on a modern tripod, was his accordion camera with its intense red bellows. Only steps away…

Summer Arts Intensive performs main stage musicalUnder the summer sun, something’s begun, taking over those summer nights. The 1978 movie and musical hit Grease is taking stage as part of the Summer Arts Intensive in West Fargo.…

Humor

​Talking to strangers

by Sabrina Hornung

“I don’t have a tour, like, on the back of a sweatshirt,” comedian Paula Poundstone says. “I go out every weekend. This weekend I went out Friday, Saturday and Monday. Mostly it’s Friday/Saturday or Thursday through…

The Red River Zoo is inviting adults to gather their friends and tap into your wild side for one special night of fundraising. Zoo Brew is back again at 7pm on Thursday evening, July 27th, and with even more beer to sample than…

Wellness

​Natural sleep aids

by Erin Oberlander

As I interact with clients and friends and family alike, one of the issues that comes up commonly is that of sleep. It seems that in our modern world, getting deep, nourishing sleep has become a challenge for some and a complete…

Live and Learn

​The other shoe

by HPR Contributor

By Elizabeth Nawrotnawrot@mnstate.eduI look up from my hotel lobby breakfast astonished to see a framed print of Wassily Kandinsky's "Mit und Gegen,” a masterpiece of color and composition that just happens to be my favorite…

“…the struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting.” – Milan Kundera“It may seem kind of bleak to say that the future of our planet rests in large part on the consciences of Republican…