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​Just opened: Wild Terra Cider and Brewing

by Logan Macrae | .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) | All About Food | December 13th, 2017

Wild Terra Cider and Brewing - photograph by Logan MacraeOn the Corner of University and Northern Pacific sits a building that has just been revitalized. Once a horse barn, this large picturesque structure now houses Wild Terra Cider and Brewing. When the new owners Breezee and Ethan found the structure in Downtown Fargo, the inside was “rustic.” The long rehabilitation process has now paid off.

The once dilapidated interior is now a splendor of architectural feats. When people said they were crazy for proposing the remodeling, Breezee and Ethan’s response was “watch this,” and watch we did.

When you walk into this piece of history, you are immediately warmed by the walls that are built from the structure’s original wood. The decadent lighting and wall sconces paired with the beautiful floral wallpaper bring the whole aesthetic together.

The bar has been built by a single piece of wood harvested from a large tree trunk. The booths in the corners of the room also house tables from the same ancient giant. The wooden wall behind the bar is nothing less than a sculptural triumph, and I was surprised to find out that the owner just cut pieces of wood and improvised the entire work. The lines correspond directly with structural elements on the interior and the harmonious nature of the work looks far from accidental.

As you turn left you see a metal staircase that was originally on the outside of the building. The original treads were stolen and replaced with large wood planks that serendipitously bring the whole interior together. This is something that could be considered a happy accident. Heading up these stairs leads you to the loft.

The loft is the highlight of the interior. The same wood on the walls also adorns the floors of the loft. The eclectic vintage and modern couches and chairs and the small round cocktail tables go together and make it feel like you’re in your rich uncle’s chalet, partying with your friends on holiday.

Much like the owners, the loft is a solid mix of Midwest and West Coast. This is the perfect spot for an intimate date or a meeting of minds over a cider binge.

Wild Terra started serving food on Wednesday, December 6, just four days after opening the doors. The majority of their menu is vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free. The meats and cheeses used in the production of their vegan entrées are supplied by The Herbivorous Butcher, a vegan meat and cheese shop based in Minneapolis.

Photograph by Logan Macrae

Being an omnivore, the concept of vegan “meats” piqued my interest greatly. I had to try some. I ordered the VBLT or Vegan Bacon, Lettuce and Tomato. I will admit I was initially very skeptical of the “bacon.” How can anyone replicate the smokey, crispy, and savory flavor of one of my favorite foods with a meat substitute? But substitute they did, and very successfully. Whilst I was aware that the contents of this sandwich were not actually meat, I would take this meat substitute over turkey bacon any day of the week. The textural elements of bacon were not there, but the flavor profile was totally on point, and the vegan meat had a delightful squish, much like a salami. I would totally order this again.

Now, let’s talk about the most important part of Wild Terra. The cider menu is diverse and fantastic. From dry ciders to sweet, and flavors that you would never expect, including chai tea and habanero. The curating of this list can only be described as masterful, and much like the building’s aesthetic, the list is well built, and stands on its own.

Wild Terra doesn’t serve liquor and this only aids in their ability to control the chill vibe that often gets interrupted by the introduction of spirits. The wine list is also very well devised, and while only serving two beers, they are both local and chosen with discernment..

This new addition to Downtown is a welcome change. The belief in not only sustainability but also the introduction of new ideas, trends, and concepts in not only drink but food makes Wild Terra a gem. The courage to come up with this, and fight for it, making people believe, and then not only delivering, but far exceeding the expectations of the public is a remarkable feat. Triumph is the only word for it.

I recommend a visit to Wild Terra, if only to breathe in the smell of fresh-cut wood, and feel the positive energy that lies within.

YOU SHOULD KNOW

Wild Terra Cider and Brewing

M-F 2-10pm, Sat 12-11pm, Sun 12-8pm

6 12th St N, Fargo; 701-639-6273

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