Tracker Pixel for Entry

​Summer travel and the lost art of letter writing

by Sabrina Hornung | .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) | Editorial | June 6th, 2018

Art by Troy Becker and provided by Albino Buffalo

On Sunday Raul and I found ourselves sipping champagne on a plane flying to Spain for my 34th birthday with an unofficial HPR European vacation, but don’t worry pals, we’re still bringing you your favorite weekly news. In fact, you might not even realize we’re gone until you check our Instagram.

I started reading some Hemingway to prepare for Madrid. Who knew that in the glossary for “Death in the afternoon” he would include beer and wine recommendations. Now it’s on to see if they still exist 86 years after the publishing date of that novel. I always knew he was a man after my own heart.

What’s on your to do list when you travel? I’m a big fan of savoring local flavor and respectfully dipping toes into the pools of local culture.

While we were in Oslo a few years back I discovered that the best place to find gifts for family and friends was at the thrift store. Yes, I brought my thrifting habit overseas but I found a great traditional wool jacket and a suitcase full of pewter items that would have cost me a fortune otherwise. Though I do admit that I have a soft spot for souvenir stands because they’re bound to have a spinning rack full of colorful postcards.

I’m a sucker for postcards and I guess I always have been. I was always encouraged to have pen pals growing up. It was a fun way to keep in touch. I still send postcards out, time permitting and even acquired a penpal while in Groton South Dakota a couple months ago. During the aforementioned trip to Oslo I brought a hand full back with me but still sent them out.

It’s the thought that counts right? It’s fun to get stuff in the mail and it almost feels that letter writing is becoming a lost art. My grandmother has a penpal that she has stayed in touch with for close to 50 years.

I had a good talk with Dr. Joseph Stuart associate of history at the University of Mary in Bismarck last week. He and his class are undertaking a project in which they are transcribing over 1,000 letters from WWI in honor of the centennial of the “war to end all wars.” He spoke about the student’s interaction with the letters. It’s strange to think of a generation that may or may not have grown up sending and receiving mail and who never had fits about having to use and learn cursive handwriting or passed notes in school. Rue the day the note or notebook that contained the notes was intercepted by either meddling classmates or teachers.

My friends and I thought we were safe by having secret code names that happened to be the names of the Spice Girls and for the record I was Posh Spice.

Throughout history, a lot has been learned about our interactions with the written word. Whether it be social customs, colloquialisms, folkways or current events. Dr. Stuart mentioned how some of the voices reflected in the letters might be the only words that still exist from these individuals and that statement alone really struck a chord. What will future historians learn from us?

I asked Dr, Stuart the same question and he said,“ It does raise a possibility in 100 or 200 years. Historians trying to understand the 21st century might have some serious difficulty. It might appear as another kind of dark age. Not in a sense that we weren’t advanced, but of a darkness that they can’t see what we were thinking about. Most of the records are going to be digital. Those will be lost and we won’t know what was going on inside us.”

This provides a lot of insight not only regarding the importance of the written word but also the importance of print media for the archives. Email and messenger is convenient but having the world at your fingertips can be overwhelming at times and it all becomes white noise at some point.I’m not saying that every piece of correspondence is your legacy and will go down with the ages but it’s food for thought and it’s refreshing to end up with something more than billing statements in your mailbox.

Recently in:

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Savanna’s Act passed unanimously in the U.S. Senate on Friday and will move to the U.S. House of Representatives.The bill, S. 1942, is named for Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind, a member of the Turtle Mountain Band…

by Ryan Jankeryan.janke78@gmail.comI held it off for as long as I could, but the other day, I caved. I thought I was doing okay. I made all the strong arguments. I applied the five canons of rhetoric, just like you’re supposed…

Saturday, December 15th, 3-6pmJunkyard Brewing Company, 1416 1st Ave N, MoorheadCome bare the elements with us for a good cause. Bring your spare winter gear to be donated to Churches United for the Homeless. Coats, gloves, boots,…

by Josh Boscheejoshua.boschee@yahoo.comphoto courtesy of Mitch MarrEight words that perfectly describe the beautiful spirit of Kim Winnegge."I have given my whole life to words."Those of us who knew her remember these words as a…

Gadfly

Affluenza

by Ed Raymond

What happens if conspicuous consumption becomes global?The latest National Geographic has an editorial “The Global Peril of Inequality” by UCLA Professor Jared Diamond which the entire world should read. The author of many…

FARGO - A collection of memories from High Plains Reader's annual Cocktail Showdown. Participants were judged on creativity, flavor, and presentation; and this year we added a new category. Like years before, each establishment was…

by Ben Myhrebenmyhre35@gmail.comUs North Dakotans love our Knoephla soup. I am no exception. I have fond childhood memories of sitting in my grandmother’s kitchen making this dumpling soup. From then until today, my taste buds go…

Music

Snow and Flurry

by HPR Contributor

by Jacques Harvieux jacquesthejock@gmail.comMosh pit etiquette 101: The mosh pit is located front and center of the stage.Create a sizeable ring.When the music starts unleash mayhem. If you fall - get up immediately.If somebody…

“The Diary of a Teenage Girl” director Marielle Heller beautifully translates another personal autobiography to excellent results. “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” is based on the confessional 2008 memoir of literary forger Lee…

SEBEKA, Minnesota – Nearly a century ago the nation was racked by inclement weather, soaring unemployment, and despair following World War I and the lucrative Roaring 20s. The 1930s were an era of dust storms and lunch lines,…

by Ryan Jankeryan.janke78@gmail.comFargo-Moorhead Community Theatre presents “A Christmas Story: The Musical” which is underway at the Stage at Island Park and will run through December 22. It has been promoted as a show both…

Those who have been reading my articles for a while may remember when I interviewed Zachary Tooker about the Level Two Comedy Club at the Radisson in Fargo. While the club may have unfortunately closed, Tooker has not ceased…

by Gabrielle Herschgabbyhersch@gmail.comphotography by Logan MacraeEver wish you could go to your favorite brewery without leaving your house? Finally, you can (sort of). Kilstone Brewing is now doing limited can releases of some…

I’m a big man, I’m tall and powerful, but this also causes some issues in the body department. I suffer from acute scoliosis in my lower back, and pain radiates from this area on a daily basis. I have only ever had one massage…

by Devin Joubertdevinlillianjoubert@gmail.comIt’s that beautiful time of the year that’s filled with seasonal decorations, sparkly lights, warm family gatherings, and delicious feasts. I love everything about this time of the…

“(Søren) Kierkegaard…has opened our eyes to the shallowness of much of our pseudo-Christian life, and to the outright deception in politics which Christianity has been made to serve.” - William Hubben“The people starve…