Tracker Pixel for Entry

​Wasn’t it good, Norwegian Wood

HPR Abroad | June 30th, 2016

By Logan Harle and Angie Perez

loganharle@yahoo.com

angieperez@csu.fullerton.edu

The festival market in Norway has increased tremendously in the past 20 years, so much that 40 percent of the population attended a festival in 2014, according to the Norwegian Knowledge Centre for Cultural Industries.

One of those festivals is the annual and iconic Norwegian Wood Festival, which is usually a three-day-long festival that’s had an estimated eight to nine thousand people in attendance per day last year, according to one of the original founders, Joergen Roll. This year, however, Norwegian Wood shrunk to one day with three acts including Israel Nash, BIGBANG, and Wilco.

The downgrade in size is said to be due to competition with new and upcoming festivals and limited dates in Norway’s prime festival season in June. Every festival tries to avoid dates in July because that is the time of the year everyone goes on vacation. Festivals try to book in June as that is when people are in town and are willing to spend money on festivals.

Roll said Norwegian Wood missed out on a possible 25 headliners because of competition with other festivals. But Roll believes that this year’s reduction in artists is due to “bad luck”.

“Every year you have bad luck with some but not like 20 different artists,” Roll said. “So it’s been a very special year.”

According to the Cultural Editor of Dagsavisen, Oslo’s daily newspaper, Mode Steinjker, the festival market in Oslo has been collapsing more or less because of the big festivals that have been in Oslo for a long time and up and coming festivals that more exciting than the older ones.

“It won't be the same this year because it’s not a progressive festival like how it use to be,” Steinkjer said.

Film Institution blaaa and former press officer of Norwegian Wood, Jacob Berg, said the problem with Norwegian Wood is that the festival has a broad profile, where they try to reach all types of audience members. In today’s market newer festivals try to reach a specific audience, booking artist according to genre. This is the reason why the festival ended up with only three artists, because of issues booking bands needed to fit their profile, according to Berg.

“It’s due to competition and the lack of relevant artists,” Berg said. “It doesn't have the same profile. It used to have a niche that is gone now.”

In past years Norwegian Wood has always been capable of booking so many great artists, although they didn’t manage to do that early enough this year, according to Berg.

Even though the festival didn’t live up to their standards of previous years, Israel Nash Gripka, the lead vocalist and guitarist from American band Israel Nash, said he is proud to be a part of Norwegian Wood.

“I think we’re honored to be a part of this festival, despite how massive Norwegian Wood was last year and the years before,” said Gripka. “The fact that it’s paired down to three people and we’re a part of that, when there could’ve been so many other artists to do it, is great.”

According to Steinkjer, the lack of performances, attendance and ticket sales, could lead to Norwegian Wood’s last year.

“I want to see what is left of Norwegian Wood,” said Steinkjer. “I think I will be surprised if they manage to raise money for next year's festival.”

Despite what critics say, Roll said that next year’s 25th anniversary of Norwegian Wood will be back to three days. Roll said that they will be starting to book artists earlier, the day after Norwegian wood this year, to be exact.

“Why shouldn’t we have high hopes for next year? We’ve had almost a million people for shows before,” Roll said.






Recently in:

By Laura Simmonssabrina@hpr1.com The recent overturn of Roe v. Wade allowed North Dakota Attorney General Drew Wrigley to sign North Dakota’s trigger law, making abortion illegal starting July 28, 2022. Organizations providing…

By Melissa Van Der Stad  m.forfargo@gmail.comphoto credit: Keith Hapip, Jr.One North Dakota family is in the midst of an ongoing dispute with the…

July 29-30Newman Outdoor FieldSummer doesn’t get much better than when you’re Blues Festin’ out on the ballfield where the RedHawks play. Thirteen bands over two days. Lotsa food and awesome people. Friday’s lineup,…

By Sabrina Hornungsabrina@hpr1.comPhoto by Sabrina HornungOur opinion: In the sanctity of the community living roomLast Saturday, we said goodbye to our friend Marcy at an intimate graveside service. Marcy was the proprietress of…

By Ed Raymondfargogadfly@gmail.com What Kind of a United States Do You Want in 2022: Diverse Democracy or MAGA?The 2022 elections will likely determine whether the American poor and middle class will be as powerful in 2023 as the…

Well shiver me timbers. After weeks of sampling some of the finest drinks in F-M from more bars than we could shake a belaying pin at, the results of High Plains Reader’s 6th Annual Cocktail Showdown are in! For nine weeks,…

By Rick Gionrickgion@gmail.comWhile the Fargo-Moorhead area offers many great things to dine on these days, there are some hopeful establishments that would make for big improvements to the local food scene here.The first…

By Michael Strikemichaelstrike.solo@gmail.comBindle Fest is coming back to Fargo, and the third time's the charm for this sprawling DIY fest hosted across the Fargo/Moorhead area. Since its first inception in 2016, it's been an…

By Greg Carlsongregcarlson1@gmail.comFilmmaker and educator Raymond Rea, who recently retired from Minnesota State University Moorhead, made an indelible impact on the Fargo-Moorhead film community. In 2008, Rea arrived in…

By Sabrina Hornungsabrina@hpr1.comArtwork: Woodcut by Danielle Gravon titled "Allegory of Fargo Winter I"On June 18, the Rourke will be holding their 62nd annual Midwestern Preview, the date celebrating the opening anniversary of…

By Jessica M. Hawkesjmhawkes84@gmail.comIt wasn’t long after the founding of the railroad and river town of New Rockford that entertainment venues started to put down their own roots. Its population bolstered by booms of nearby…

By Sabrina Hornungsabrina@hpr1.comCharlie Berens is a man of many hats. The creator of the “Manitowoc Minute” is a newsman, comedian, writer and musician. We had the opportunity to speak with the Wisconsin native about his new…

By Kris Gruberperriex1@gmail.comSpring is here (mostly), and our area is buzzing with people eager to get back out and about -- many newly vaccinated and feeling a bit safer. Partnering with Jade Events, Fargo Brewing is just…

by Laurie J Bakeremsdatter@gmail.com Part of modern yoga is participating in the world around us. We live in a time of upheaval in society and nature, and of great suffering in humans of all ages. Most of us perceive this suffering…

By Sabrina Hornungsabrina@hpr1.comLehr Mayor and Council Members Donate City Salaries To Save Legion HallEvery rural community has at least one social space that holds multiple generations of memories and has remained a social…

By Madeline Lukemadelineluke@ymail.comSonja Kaye, of CLEAN in Fargo gave the third of four talks on climate change issues specific to North Dakota for the “What in the World Series,” in Valley City on April 5. While the topic…