Tracker Pixel for Entry

Warm up with a hot toddy

by HPR Contributor | .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) | Beer Snob | October 10th, 2018


by Ben Myhre
benmyhre35@gmail.com 

Fall is once again upon us. The leaves are turning, gardens have been pulled, and Summer’s heat has waned into Autumnal frosts. Along with the change of seasons comes a change of seasonal flavors. One cocktail that comes to mind as the temperatures cool is the Hot Toddy. Today I am going to share my recipe for a classic Hot Toddy and also give you some of the interesting historical details of this cocktail.

What is a Hot Toddy?

A Hot Toddy is a classic brandy cocktail that is served warm and has many Fall flavors. The recipe I use includes cinnamon, cloves, honey, lemon, and brandy. Brandy is distilled wine, but whiskey is also a popular spirit for this cocktail. This drink comes together very much like what one might expect for a traditional hot tea, but one that meant for adults. I consider it a warm, restorative, adult cocktail that is perfect on a cool Fall or Winter night.

History Of The Hot Toddy

The history of a cocktail often reveals interesting world connections and stories. How did the Hot Toddy come about and when did it become a drink? There are a few different theories on how this classic cocktail came about, but I like one in particular, so that is what I am going to share today.

First, we have to talk about the medicinal purposes of alcohol and its place in history. Most modern doctors would call a person crazy if they suggested that we should be drinking whiskey or brandy as a medicine. The opposite was true in olden times. Medical professionals often prescribed alcohol to both heal and prevent problems. It really was not that long ago when a Whiskey Old Fashioned was considered a morning drink and the doctor might tell you to go home and have a brandy to ease your ailment. At one point, it really was the only anesthesia.

Second, let’s talk about water. In Scotland in the early modern era (the 1500s and 1600s), there was a water supply called Tod’s Well. It was once a main water supply to Edinburgh and the water was considered very clean and to have medicinal properties. While other water sources may have been considered tainted or perhaps became polluted, this water supply was clean. Tod’s Well was a spring of health and by the name of it, I bet you can see where this is going.

The health professionals of the time were prescribing whiskey, but whiskey can be considered to be difficult to drink by some. While this is a nearly impossible notion for me to believe, I can perhaps see why straight whiskey might be difficult to drink. Particularly in early times, whiskey was not aged and likely the stuff available to the average person was fairly rough tasting.

One way to soften the sting of a strong whiskey was with water and sweetener. Modern granular sugar was not a widely available product in this era and only for the rich (if available at all), but honey may have been available. We can turn the strong medicine of whiskey into a subtle and tasty tonic with some water and honey.

The combination of liquor, water from Tod’s Well, and a sweetener come together to create the big bang of the Hot Toddy. And lucky for us! Time has allowed us to better refine the drink. And, if you are sick, I would suggest seeing a doctor before drinking any alcohol. Now, let’s have at it and here is the adult cocktail classic, The Hot Toddy.

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup Hot Water
  • 5 cloves
  • 1 Tablespoon Honey
  • 1.5 ounces Brandy
  • 1 Cinnamon stick
  • 1 Slice of Lemon

Instructions

  1. While water is heating, add honey, cloves, cinnamon, and brandy to Irish coffee mug or other coffee mug
  2. Once water is heated, pour into mug
  3. Squeeze lemon slice into water
  4. Stir with spoon and serve hot

[Editor’s note:Ben is the mind and tastebuds behind Ramshackle Pantry, for more information on the history of the toddy visit https://ramshacklepantry.com/hot-toddy-history/]

Recently in:

By the time this article is published, all the major new outlets in the area will have reported on the May 30th protest in Fargo demanding change and justice after the needless killing of George Floyd, as well as its aftermath. …

by Sonja ThompsonDebra Ruh is the CEO and Founder of Ruh Global IMPACT, a consulting firm that strives to help clients amplify their impact and become disability inclusion leaders. She also serves as the Chair of the United…

Best Bets

Ladies Ag Night

by HPR Staff

Thursday, March 19, 4:30- 8 pm1609 19th Ave N, FargoCass County Soil Conservation District is hosting their annual Ladies’ Ag Night supper event. This event has a goal of bringing together multiple generations of women involved…

by Sofia Makarova and Massimo Sassi The global pandemic is an incredibly challenging time for many. Nearlyone in every three Americans’ jobs have been affected, whether a temporary layoff, a permanent job loss, or a reduction in…

The New Normal: The Senate Of The Living DeadIn the 1968 film classic The Night Of The Living Dead, the dead have come back to life and are marching through forests and farms looking for food. They look just like us except for the…

To say that this year’s Bartenders Battle was the best display of talent in the six years since its creation would be an understatement and a disservice to not only the bartenders who made it into the competition, but also the…

It goes without saying that Valentine’s Day is the most profitable of all the holidays and the one with the most tortured history, literally. It is confusing how an ancient Roman festival that involved sacrificing animals and…

Fargo obviously loves their classical music. Audiences have still turned out during the 2019-2020 season of the Sanford Masterworks Series performed by the Fargo-Moorhead Symphony Orchestra despite an unrelenting winter. That…

Well-deserved praise for writer-director Amy Seimetz’s efficient and provocative “She Dies Tomorrow” almost inevitably points to the film’s eerie timeliness as a metaphor for pandemic-inspired malaise and disequilibrium.…

This weekend, the 10th Annual Unglued Craft Fest will be held at the Plains Art Museum, featuring over 70 local and regional artists selling handmade items. Though most are Fargo-Moorhead residents, artists from Minneapolis, Sioux…

Theatre

Fargo Film Festival 2020

by HPR Contributor

by Dominic EricksonThis March, the Fargo Film Festival will celebrate its 20th year of entertaining die-hard cinephiles and casual moviegoers alike. The festival begins on March 17 and concludes March 21. The event is once again…

by Kris Gruberperriex1@gmail.comAdam Quesnell's last show at The Cellar beneath the Front Street Taproom in Fargo was in early September of 2018. He was embarking on a seminal move from Minneapolis to LA. As always, his comedy was…

by Jill Finkelsonjsfinkelson99@gmail.comFar North Spirits, located up in Hallock, MN, is the northernmost distillery in the lower 48. They may be young in the distillery world but the farm and the spirit reach far into the past.…

Wellness

Discover Yoga Differently

by HPR Contributor

by Laurie J Bakeremsdatter@gmail.com Part of modern yoga is participating in the world around us. We live in a time of upheaval in society and nature, and of great suffering in humans of all ages. Most of us perceive this suffering…

by Devin Joubertdevinlillianjoubert@gmail.comIt’s that beautiful time of the year that’s filled with seasonal decorations, sparkly lights, warm family gatherings, and delicious feasts. I love everything about this time of the…

“(Kafka’s) world knows no physical or moral order…We, the readers, are reliving our bad dreams…punishment is over all the characters, but the crime remains mysteriously hidden…” - William Hubben“The specter of color is…